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Runtime Code happens when Microsoft Access fails or crashes whilst specifisd runninghence its name. Browsing Tables with the Navigation Pane. Earn Credits. Method 3 – Update your Virus protection program or download and install the latest Windows Update.❿
 
 

Microsoft access 2013 cant find the database you specified free.Question Info

 

Sometimes when you try to open an existing Microsoft Access database using a shortcut, then you may receive the following error message. Specify a valid database name in the command line, and include a path if necessary. Error Number: Error Specify a valid database name in the command line and include a path if necessary. Access Error messages can appear during program installation, start-up or shutdown, or even during linking with the database.

The above behavior may occur also when the following condition gets true:. Creating Your First Database. Understanding Access Databases. Note Designing a database is the process of adding and configuring database objects. Starting a Database. Tip You can get the Bobblehead database, and all the databases in this book, on the Missing CD page at www. Figure When you start Access, you see this two-part welcome page. On the left is a list of recently opened databases if you have any.

On the right is a list of templates that you can use to create a new database. This database will be named Bobblehead. You can edit the file name by typing in the File Name box, and you can browse to a different folder by clicking the folder icon. Note Depending on your computer settings, Windows may hide file extensions. It also gives you the option to create your database in the format used by older versions of Access.

The Access Options window appears. In the list on the left, choose General. The navigation pane on the left lets you see different items or objects in your database. You can use the navigation pane to jump from a list of products to a list of customers and back again.

The ribbon along the top groups together every Access command. This ribbon is the mission control that lets you perform various tasks with your database. The document window in the middle takes up the rest of the window. Building Your First Table. In a table, each record occupies a separate row. Each field is represented by a separate column.

Creating a Simple Table. To define your table, simply add your first record. Then, hit Tab to jump to the second column, and then enter the second piece of information. Ignore the ID column for now—Access adds that to every table to identify your records. The only problem with this example so far is that as you enter a new record, Access creates spectacularly useless field names. You see its choices at the top of each column they have names like Field1, Field2, Field3, and so on.

The problem with using these meaningless names is that they may lead you to enter a piece of information in the wrong place. You could all too easily put the purchase price in the date column. To specify better field names, double-click the column title. Next, type the real field name, and then press Enter.

Editing a Table. Edit Mode. Top: Normal mode. Bottom: Edit mode. Datasheet Shortcut Keys. Table Keys for Moving Around the Datasheet. Home Moves the cursor to the first field in the current row. End Moves the cursor to the last field in the current row.

Page Up Moves the cursor up one screenful. Keys for Editing Records. An Access user has been on an eBay buying binge and needs to add several doll records.

Cut, Copy, and Paste. Click the margin to the left of the record you want to copy. Right-click the selection, and then choose Copy. This copies the content to the Clipboard. Scroll to the bottom of the table until you see the new-row marker the asterisk. Right-click the margin just to the left of the new-row marker, and then choose Paste.

Saving Databases. Note Remember, when you click File, you enter Backstage view, which provides a narrow strip of commands on the left and a page with options for the currently selected command on the right. Making Backups. When you choose to create a backup, Access fills in a suggested file name that incorporates the current date.

That way, if you have several backup files, you can pick out the one you want. Saving a Database with a Different Name. Saving a Database in a Different Format. Tip Older database formats are less reliable and may not support all of the Access features you want to use.

Shrinking a Database. Note If you compact a brand-new database, Access shows a harmless security warning when the database is reopened. You should consider backing up your files and freeing up space on your hard drive You can also clear your cache and reboot your computer You can also run Disk Cleanup, open your explorer window and right click your main directory this is usually C: Click Properties and then click Disk Cleanup.

For Windows 10, just type Control Panel on the search box and click the result, then click Uninstall a program Once inside Programs and Features, click the problem program and click Update or Uninstall. If you chose to update, then you will just need to follow the prompt to complete the process, however if you chose to Uninstall, you will follow the prompt to uninstall and then re-download or use the application’s installation disk to reinstall the program. Using Other Methods For Windows 7, you may find the list of all installed programs when you click Start and scroll your mouse over the list that appear on the tab.

You may see on that list utility for uninstalling the program. You may go ahead and uninstall using utilities available in this tab. For Windows 10, you may click Start, then Settings, then choose Apps.

Scroll down to see the list of Apps and features installed in your computer. Click the Program which is causing the runtime error, then you may choose to uninstall or click Advanced options to reset the application. Method 4 – Re-install Runtime Libraries. What you can do then is to uninstall the current package and install a fresh copy.

Click Uninstall on top of the list, and when it is done, reboot your computer. This particular error code can be caused by a variety of factors, so it becomes to troubleshoot each of the causes so that effective recovery can be possible. Repair Registry Entries Associated with Error To fix up this error code with Windows registry is only recommended if you are PC service professional.

Even when the ribbon is collapsed, you can still use all its features. Just click a tab. If you click Home, the Home tab pops up over your worksheet. As soon as you click the button you want in the Home tab or click somewhere else in the Access window , the ribbon collapses itself again. The same trick works if you trigger a command in the ribbon using the keyboard, as described on Using the Ribbon with the Keyboard.

If you use the ribbon only occasionally, or if you prefer to use keyboard shortcuts, it makes sense to collapse the ribbon. Even when collapsed, the ribbon commands are available; it just takes an extra click to open the tab.

So far, you know how to open a table using the navigation pane. You can actually perform three more simple tasks with any database object that shows up in the navigation pane:. Rename it. Right-click the object, and then choose Rename. Type in the new name, and then press Enter. Create a copy. Right-click the object, and then choose Copy. Right-click anywhere in the navigation pane, and then choose Paste.

Delete it. Right-click the object, and then choose Delete. Access gives you a few more options for transferring database objects and tucking them out of sight.

You probably already know that you can place a Windows shortcut on your desktop that points to your database file. Now, anytime you want to jump back into your database, you can double-click your shortcut.

In fact, this maneuver is even easier than creating a plain-vanilla shortcut. Just follow these steps:. This way, you can see the desktop behind Access, which is essential for this trick. Find the table you want to use in the navigation pane. Drag this table out of Access and over the desktop. Release the mouse button.

Skip to main content. Start your free trial. Chapter 1. Creating Your First Database. Understanding Access Databases. Note Designing a database is the process of adding and configuring database objects. Starting a Database. Tip You can get the Bobblehead database, and all the databases in this book, on the Missing CD page at www.

Figure When you start Access, you see this two-part welcome page. On the left is a list of recently opened databases if you have any. On the right is a list of templates that you can use to create a new database. This database will be named Bobblehead. You can edit the file name by typing in the File Name box, and you can browse to a different folder by clicking the folder icon.

Note Depending on your computer settings, Windows may hide file extensions. It also gives you the option to create your database in the format used by older versions of Access.

The Access Options window appears. In the list on the left, choose General. The navigation pane on the left lets you see different items or objects in your database. You can use the navigation pane to jump from a list of products to a list of customers and back again. The ribbon along the top groups together every Access command. This ribbon is the mission control that lets you perform various tasks with your database.

The document window in the middle takes up the rest of the window. Building Your First Table. In a table, each record occupies a separate row. Each field is represented by a separate column. Creating a Simple Table. To define your table, simply add your first record. Then, hit Tab to jump to the second column, and then enter the second piece of information.

Ignore the ID column for now—Access adds that to every table to identify your records. The only problem with this example so far is that as you enter a new record, Access creates spectacularly useless field names. You see its choices at the top of each column they have names like Field1, Field2, Field3, and so on. The problem with using these meaningless names is that they may lead you to enter a piece of information in the wrong place.

You could all too easily put the purchase price in the date column. To specify better field names, double-click the column title. Before approaching for this windows registry setting, make a proper backup. With the prolonged use of system and web surfing your system gets accumulated with some junk files which must be occasionally cleaned out, otherwise it causes Microsoft Access to get slower to respond or throwing this error , possibly just because of the overload hard drive or file conflicts.

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Microsoft access 2013 cant find the database you specified free.6 Ways To Fix Microsoft Access “Can’t find the database you specified”

 
Method 1: Repair Registry Entries Associated With Error · Method 2: Conduct A Full Malware Scan Of Your PC · Method 3: Clean Out Your System Junk (Temporary. When I open up Access , I get a dialog box saying “Can’t Find the database you specified, or you did not specify a database at all. Method 1 – Close Conflicting Programs When you get a runtime error, keep in mind that it is happening due to programs that are conflicting. How To Fix MS Access Error “Can’t Find The Database You Specified” · 1. Click On the Start · 2. Press Windows button + R, · 3. Type “cleanmgr”. Microsoft Access Runtime says, “Cannot find the database you specified, or you didn’t specify a database at all.” What is this? All related (32).❿
 
 

Microsoft access 2013 cant find the database you specified free.Comments navigation

 
 

Macros are mini-programs that automate custom tasks. Macros are a simple way to get custom results without becoming a programmer. Modules are files that contain Visual Basic code. You can use this code to do just about anything—from updating 10, records to firing off an email. Access gurus refer to all these database ingredients as objects because you manage them all in essentially the same way.

If you want to use a particular object, you add it to your database, give it a name, and then fine-tune it. Designing a database is the process of adding and configuring database objects. For those keeping score, an Access database can hold up to 32, separate objects. But first, you need to create a blank database you can work with. When you start Access, you begin at the welcome page.

This example is designed to store a list of prized bobblehead dolls. Bobblehead dolls usually resemble a famous celebrity, politician, athlete, or fictional character. You can get the Bobblehead database, and all the databases in this book, on the Missing CD page at www. Start Access. Access starts you out with what is, for Microsoft, a remarkably streamlined window Figure Here you can create a new database or open an existing one.

Starting from scratch is the best way to learn about Access. Other templates let you create databases that are preconfigured for specific scenarios and certain types of data.

It lets you create a web-enabled database that runs on SharePoint. No matter which template you click, Access pops open a new window that lets you choose a name and location for your new database Figure The example in this section shows you how to create a blank database.

Templates aim to save you the work of creating a new database and let you jump straight to the fine-tuning and data-entry stage. To give it a whirl, click one of a dozen or so templates that are shown in the main Access window. Access stores all the information for a database in a single file with the extension. Instead, pick something more descriptive. In this example, Bobblehead. Depending on your computer settings, Windows may hide file extensions.

Instead of seeing the Access database file MyScandalousWedding. In this case, you can still tell the file type by looking at the icon. Choose the folder where you want to store your database. Like all Office programs, Access assumes you want to store every file you create in your personal Documents folder. Click the big Create button under the File Name box. Access creates your database file and then shows a datasheet where you can get to work creating your first table.

Access always assumes you want to store databases in your Documents folder. You can configure Access to use this folder with just a few steps:. Once you create or open a database, the Access window changes quite a bit. An impressive-looking toolbar the ribbon appears at the top of your screen, and a Navigation Pane shows up on the left.

Tables are information containers. But if you find yourself wanting to store several lists of related information, you need more than one table.

In the database BigBudgetWedding. Figure shows a sample table. A table is a group of records. A record is a collection of information about a single thing. In the Dolls table, for example, each record represents a single bobblehead doll. In a Family table, each record would represent a single relative. You get the idea. When you create a new database, Access starts you out with a new table named Table1 , although you can choose a more distinctive name when you decide to save it.

Each record is subdivided into fields. Each field stores a distinct piece of information. For example, in the Dolls table, one field stores the person on whom the doll is based, another field stores the price, another field stores the date you bought it, and so on.

Tables have a rigid structure. Newly created tables get an ID field for free. The ID field stores a unique number for each record.

Think of it as a reference number that will let you find a specific record later on. Access chooses a new ID number for you and inserts it in the record automatically. Many database gurus suggest that before you fire up Access, you should decide exactly what information you want to store by brainstorming.

Next, jot down all your must-have pieces of information on a piece of paper. Some details are obvious. Other details, like the year it was produced, the company that created it, and a short description of its appearance or condition may require more thought. The bobblehead doll example demonstrates an important theme of database design: First you plan the database, and then you create it using Access. But to get you started, Access creates your first database object—a table named Table1.

The problem is, this table begins life completely blank, with no defined fields and no data. All you need to do is customize this table so that it meets your needs.

Design view lets you precisely define all aspects of a table before you start using it. Datasheet view is where you enter data into a table. Datasheet view also lets you build a table on the fly as you insert new information. The following steps show you how to turn a blank new table like Table1 into the Dolls table by using the Datasheet view:. In this case, that means choosing a bobblehead doll to add to the list.

Access tables are unsorted , which means they have no underlying order. However, you can sort them any way you want when you need to retrieve information later on.

Based on the simple analysis you performed earlier, you know that you need to enter four fields of information for every doll. Although you could start with any field, it makes sense to begin with the name, which is clearly an identifying detail. Press Tab to move to the next field, and return to step 2. You may notice one quirk—a harmless one—when you add your first record. If you make a mistake, you can backtrack using the arrow keys.

A single field can hold entire paragraphs of information. Most people prefer to see the entire contents of a column at once. To expand a column, just position your mouse at the right edge of the column header. To expand a column named Field1, move your mouse to the right edge of the Field1 box. Then, drag the column to the right to resize it as big as you want. Move the mouse over the right edge of the column, so it turns into a two-way arrow.

Then, simply double-click the column edge. Double-click the first column title like Field1. Figure shows how it works. You can always rename fields later, or even add entirely new fields. Access asks you to supply a table name see Figure As you can see, creating a simple table in Access is almost as easy as laying out information in Excel or Word.

But before you get to that stage, it makes sense to take a closer look at how you edit your table. You now have a fully functioning albeit simple database, complete with one table, which in turn contains one record.

Your next step is filling your table with useful information. This often-tedious process is data entry. To fill the Dolls table, you use the same datasheet you used to define the table. You can perform three basic tasks:. Editing a record. Move to the appropriate spot in the datasheet using the arrow keys or the mouse , and then type in a replacement value.

You may also want to use Edit mode, which is described in the next section. Inserting a new record. At that point, Access creates the row and moves the asterisk down to the next row. You can repeat this process endlessly to add as many rows as you want Access can handle millions.

Deleting a record. You have several ways to remove a record, but the easiest is to right-click the margin immediately to the left of the record, and then choose Delete Record.

Most seasoned database designers rarely delete records from their databases. Every ounce of information is important. For example, imagine you have a database that lists the products that a mail-order origami company has for sale. But it turns out that it makes sense to keep these old product records around. For example, you might want to find out what product categories were the best sellers over the previous year.

Or maybe a manufacturer issues a recall of asbestos-laced paper, and you need to track down everyone who ordered it. To perform either of these tasks, you need to refer to past product records. This hang-onto-everything rule applies to any kind of database.

You need them all and you probably need to keep them indefinitely. You can then ignore those products when you build an order-placement form. So settle in. To make your life easier, it helps to understand a few details.

As you already know, you can use the arrow keys to move from field to field or row to row. However, you may have a bit of trouble editing a value. When you start typing, Access erases any existing content. Instead, you get to change or add to it. To switch out of Edit mode, you press F2 again. Figure shows a close-up look at the difference. Edit mode also affects how the arrow keys work.

In Edit mode, the arrow keys move through the current field. For example, to move to the next cell, you need to move all the way to the end of the current text, and then press the right arrow key again. But in Normal mode, pressing the arrow keys always moves you from cell to cell.

Table lists some useful keys that can help you whiz around the datasheet. Moves the cursor one field to the right, or down when you reach the edge of the table.

Moves the cursor one field to the left, or up when you reach the edge of the table. This key also turns off Edit mode. Moves the cursor one field to the right in Normal mode , or down when you reach the edge of the table. In Edit mode, this key moves the cursor through the text in the current field. Moves the cursor one field to the left in Normal mode , or up when you reach the edge of the table. Moves the cursor to the first field in the current row. Moves the cursor to the last field in the current row.

Moves the cursor to the first field in the first row. Moves the cursor to the last field in the last row. Table lists some convenient keys for editing records. This key works only if you use it in Edit mode. Once you move to the next cell, the change is applied. For additional cancellation control, try the Undo feature, described next. Reverses the last edit.

This trick is handy when you need to enter a batch of records with similar information. Figure shows this often-overlooked trick in action. Access, like virtually every Windows program, lets you cut and paste bits of information from one spot to another. However, Access has a little-known ability that lets you copy an entire record.

To pull it off, follow these steps:. This selects the record. Presto—an exact duplicate. Access updates the ID column for your pasted record, giving it a new number. It automatically saves any edits you make to the records in a table. This automatic-saving process takes place every time you change a record, and it happens almost instantaneously.

The rules are a bit different for database objects Understanding Access Databases. When you add or edit a database object, Access waits until you finish and close the object, at which point it prompts you to save or discard your changes. Remember, when you click File, you enter Backstage view, which provides a narrow strip of commands on the left and a page with options for the currently selected command on the right. You use Backstage view to open, save, and convert database files—see The Quick Access Toolbar if you need a quick review about how it works.

The automatic save feature can pose a problem if you make a change mistakenly. You can perform these tasks with Windows Explorer, but Access gives you an even easier option. This opens a Save As window that offers to create a copy of your database, in the location you choose Figure I see an extra file with the extension. What gives? Access creates a. Access uses the. Access makes this job easy.

Access opens a Save As window, where you can browse to a different folder on your hard drive and type a new file name. Keep in mind that once Access creates the new database file, that file is the one it keeps using. In other words, if you create another table or edit some of your data, Access updates the new file. If you want to go back to the old file, you need to open it in Access again.

Alternatively, you can use the backup feature described in the previous section. When you create a new database, Access uses its modern. Microsoft introduced the. That makes it the go-to choice for new databases. However, there may be times when you need to share your data with people who are using truly ancient copies of Access. Versions before Access use a different database format, called. And, as you can see in Figure , the.

The standard. But if you need to share databases with people running much older versions of Access, the. Older database formats are less reliable and may not support all of the Access features you want to use. The best approach is to stick with the. However, if possible, keep using the modern. You can also use the old-style. Access opens the File New Database window which you saw back in Figure Instead, Access is more concerned with getting information in and out of the database as quickly as it can.

If you want to trim your database back to size, you can use a feature called compacting. Access then closes your database, compacts it, and opens it again. If you compact a brand-new database, Access shows a harmless security warning when the database is reopened. The only problem with the database-compacting feature is that you need to remember to use it.

If you want to keep your databases as small as possible at all times, you can switch on a setting that tells Access to compact the current database every time you close it. If the above methods fail to resolve the issue, using a professional Access database repair utility, such as Stellar Repair for MS Access, can help restore an inaccessible database. The software also helps recover all the database objects like linked tables, deleted records, macros, forms, etc.

The error may occur when making changes to an existing database design or creating a new database with an Access runtime program. In that case, upgrade to a full version of the program and check if it resolves the issue.

If you encounter the error when trying to open a database of the Access runtime application by using a shortcut, try uninstalling and reinstalling the application.

But if none of the manual workarounds works, using a specialized Access database repair tool can help you restore an inaccessible database, keeping all its data intact. Online Events. Login Join. Home Databases Microsoft Access How-tos. Microsoft Access. Priyal Stellar Info Tech This person is a verified professional. Verify your account to enable IT peers to see that you are a professional. Dec 09, 3 Minute Read.

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